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beirut-fish


BEIRUT FISH

Beirut, Lebanon
GPS 33°53'47.9"N 35°28'44.5"E


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Fast facts

  • Cute fish stencil in Makdessi street, Beirut
  • This fabulous fish is stenciled everywhere on the walls in Beirut by an unknown artist
  • 'Nobody knows why but the fish looks great.'

These pretty little fish swimming all around on the walls of Beirut, we’d like to address from three different points of view:

First, the history of making funny fish faces

Every single one of us has done it, and every single one of us is still very amused when someone does it. Yes indeed, the funny fish face. Suck your cheeks in, make your eyes pop, move your lips, there it is! Now you better start practicing peeps, because the duck face got too mainstream and so the fish face is totally making a comeback. 

Second, where to go for the best seafood in Beirut

We did a little research and found a top five list for best seafood in Beirut.
Go there or be square. 

  1. Babel bay, for luxury dining with Lebanese seafood 
  2. Osaka sushi lounge, Japanese seafood in style 
  3. Meat the fish, for healthy, Asian & Mediterranean seafood 
  4. Mhanna Sur Mer, for romantic dining 
  5. Al sultan Brahim, luxury dining downtown 

Third, about the history of Beirut aka only dead fish
go with the flow

In this country that has known a lot of political violence and economic struggle, you will find that its street art is often a flashback to their history and carries kind of a heavy weight. This art, often of high quality, shows it is done by people that care about the history of their country, and in a way it seems that this way they try to keep the memories of the past alive. 

Take for example Yazan Halwani. He was born a few years after the civil war officially ended, but he could still feel the impact of the war and the fractures of the fact that the city had been divided in two parts and into different neighborhoods. The first logos that were found on the walls in Beirut, were drawn by militias, as a form of propaganda. As he felt there was no space for culture, he decided to do something different. He wanted to create art that was meaningful to the city and so he was the first to swim against the stream. Meanwhile, other artists followed his path. Some even say that their graffiti brings Beirut alive.


Thank you
Curated and shot by talented photographer Isabel Corthier. 
Discover her work here > isabelcorthier.com


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